Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

Resources / Course Descriptions

Descriptions of courses offered by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

Criminal Justice (CRJU)

  • CRJU 1101 - Foundations of Criminal Justice

    • This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be on crime in America, the criminal justice process, law enforcement, adjudication, punishment, corrections, and prisons. Other special issues to be addressed include AIDS, changing roles of women, and criminal justice systems in other countries.

       Notes: Offered as an online course.

    • Prerequisites: None
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Criminal Justice

    • This course examines the effects of crime and criminal behavior on society and how the criminal justice system responds to the problems of crime and criminality.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if required.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • CRJU 3300 - Criminal Courts

    • This course examines the history, development, structure, operation, and organization of criminal court systems in federal and state courts in the United States. Emphasis is given to juvenile courts and court administration. Other topics include the roles of major professional and non-professional courtroom participants; stages in the process of adjudication of criminal cases from initial charging through post-conviction review; and an introduction to the constitutional rights of the accused.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3301 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

    • This course provides an introduction to concepts and techniques of social science research. Students will (a) become familiar with levels of measurement, sampling techniques, research design, and research techniques, and (b) apply these techniques to the study of specific research questions in criminal justice.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3305 - Technology and Criminal Justice

    • This course involves an in-depth study of technology as it relates to crime and the criminal justice system. Topics discussed include technology associated with forensics, computer crime and homeland security. Legal issues and laws pertaining to the use of technology for investigative purposes, privacy issues and fourth amendment issues are examined. Various technologies used by police, courts and corrections are also addressed.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3310 - Police in America

    • An overview of the role of the police in American society, examining such issues as the police role in a democracy, ethnic tensions, unionization and professionalism, civil disturbances, law enforcement, and police misconduct.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3311 - Police Administration

    • This course familiarizes students with the principal issues facing contemporary American police administration. Students will gain an appreciation of the complex responsibilities associated with administering a police organization in a free society.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3312 - State and Federal Law Enforcement Initiatives

    • This course allows the student to participate in a seminar that includes up to date information from readings and through discussions with agents from state and federal agencies. Students will develop knowledge about state and federal agencies and their missions; the types of investigations under-taken by agencies; the use of technology by agencies and by offenders; predictions of future issues and crimes the agencies will likely face; the application/ hiring process and essential/desired skills needed to work for various agencies.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3315 - Criminal Procedure

    • This course addresses the following stages of criminal procedure and evidence: (1) methods and rules of police investigation and arrest; (2) pretrial screening of complaints: (3) formal charging of the accused; (4) adjudication - evidentiary requirements; (5) sentencing; and (6) appellate review by higher courts.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3320 - Criminal Investigation

    • This course examines the historical, theoretical, and technological aspects of the investigation of crime. The topic areas include crime scene examinations, the collection and preservation of evidence, forensic and behavioral sciences, inter-views/ interrogations, and the use of technology by law enforcement agencies.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3332 - Corrections

    • A review of the historical and philosophical back-grounds of corrections. Special emphasis is placed on the role of corrections in the criminal justice system.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3340 - Legal Analysis

    • This course involves students in the processs of reasoning objectively and arguing persuasively within a socio-legal framework. Set against a background of formal and informal logic that guides reasoning in general, the course is primarily concerned with the reasoning underlying the construction of legal arguments from judicial, legislative, and scholarly points of view. Theoretical analysis is illustrated by investigating and writing about the law, with an emphasis on topics related to crime.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3352 - Juvenile Delinquency and Corrections

    • Surveys of the definition, extent, cause, treatment, prevention, and control of juvenile delinquency.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3365 - The Profile of the Serial Offender

    • This course examines why some violent offenders repeat their crimes while others do not. Students learn the development of the offender characteristics and traits as well as investigative strategies in unsolved homicide and sexual assaults. Students examine theories and research which explains how the serial offender evolves from childhood to adult. Case presentations occur throughout the course.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3396 - Cooperative Study

    • A supervised work experience program for a minimum of two academic semesters at a previously approved site in business, industry, government or private agency related to criminal justice field. For sophomore, junior or senior level students who wish to obtain successive on the job experience in conjunction with their academic training.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of the coordinator of cooperative education (Career Services) and the internship coordinator.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 3398 - Internship

    • A structured off-campus experience in a super-vised setting that is related to the student's major and career interests. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research in the topical area of the internship, under the guidance of an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Sites must be selected in advance of the semester of the internship. A departmental internship orientation session is scheduled once a semester.
    • Prerequisites: 90 hours
    • Credits: 1-9 Credit Hours
  • CRJU 3400 - Ideological/Group Violence and Law Enforcement

    • The course will examine law enforcement response to domestic and international terror-ism. Topics will include threat analysis, intelligence processing, proactive measures, reactive measures, development of modern terrorism and specific terrorist groups.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4100 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

    • This course prepares students to think critically about ethical issues they will encounter in the criminal justice profession. Topics include uses of force, increasing cultural diversity, and the balance between freedom and security.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4300 - Organized Crime

    • This course examines the origins, histories, and activities of various major organized crime groups in the United States and throughout the world. Special emphasis is placed on emerging organized criminal enterprises in developing countries and regions. In addition, this course explores the methods used by law enforcement to combat organized crime.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4305 - Technology and Cyber Crime

    • This course provides an overview of cyber crime and computer-related crime issues facing the American criminal justice system, particularly law enforcement. The course looks at law enforcement’s ability to respond and discusses law enforcement problems in dealing with computer crime. Students will learn about government response to cyber crime problems, especially from a law enforcement perspective. Future trends of cyber crime and computer related crime will also be discussed.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4400 - Directed Study in Criminal Justice

    • Covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings.

      Notes: May include original research projects and practicum experiences.

    • Prerequisites: Approval in instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • CRJU 4410 - Criminal Profiling and Analysis

    • This course centers on the "deductive profiling" method, the analysis process of forensic evidence, and the development of offender characteristics. It approaches each crime as its own universe of social relationships and behaviors and requires the examination and analysis of a real homicide. An overview of the socio-legal aspects involving profiling and analysis of specific profiling issues in different types of serial crime are addressed.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4430 - Victimology

    • An overview of the basic concepts of criminal victimization, including society‚Äôs response to victims and their problems.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 2201 or CRJU 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4490 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    • Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • CRJU 4499 - Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice

    • This is a capstone course designed for senior-level students to apply learning from previous criminal justice courses and courses from their specific major concentration. This course addresses current issues and trends in criminal justice to integrate knowledge concerning criminal justice policy. Each student is required to prepare, submit, and present a research paper on an instructor-approved criminal justice topic.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101 and CRJU 3301.
    • Credits: 3-0-3

Sociology (SOCI)

  • SOCI 1101 - Principles of Sociology

    • This course is an overview of sociology which emphasizes the social nature of human behavior, including an introduction to culture, social structure, socialization, deviance, stratification, family, gender, religion, demography, and complex organization.
    • Prerequisites: READ 0099 if required
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 2000 - Introduction to Gender Studies

    • This course examines the ways that women's and men's gender roles are shaped by social interaction. Using materials and learning approaches from multiple disciplines, students will explore questions about how individual and group expectations about gender behavior are created and sustained.
    • Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in ENGL 1101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Sociology

    • This is one of four disciplinary options (Anthropology 2105, Sociology 2105, Geography 2105, Psychology 2105) that can be taken to satisfy the Social Issues requirement in the general education curriculum. A common set of world social issues is critically examined from one of four social science perspectives. The discipline of sociology focuses on how culture and social structure combine to shape the way human beings live their lives and define and solve their problems.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • SOCI 2210 - Professional Development for Sociology Students

    • This course is designed to introduce students to the skills and strategies necessary to successfully meet the requirements for a B.S. in Sociology. The course provides information about career opportunities in Sociology and related fields, as well as information about preparing for and applying to graduate school. The primary objective of this course is to assist students in developing a plan to reach their academic and career goals.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 2251 - Social Problems

    • An overview of current social problems facing American society with attention to developing insights into the conceptual analysis of meaningful solutions.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3300 - Foundations of Social Theory

    • This course surveys the historical development of social theory. It emphasizes the major theories and theoreticians of sociology and their importance for understanding contemporary sociology.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 2105 or 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3304 - Social Organization

    • An introduction to large scale social organizations, with an emphasis on bureaucracy. Examines both the formal and informal aspects of bureaucracy, including topics ranging from power and authority, to centralization and decentralization, red tape, and professionalism.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3305 - Research Methods in Sociology

    • This course provides an introduction to concepts and techniques used in social science research. Students acquire a foundational understanding of research methods in sociology, learn how to link theory and data, and examine the ethical considerations required for social research.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 and SOCI 2210
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3310 - Introduction to Gerontology

    • Introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of gerontology which provides an overview of the sociology, psychology, and the physiology of aging. Students will consider research and theories of aging as well as participate in field trip experiences in gerontological settings. A key goal is to develop a more realistic perception of the aging process.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3314 - Race and Ethnicity

    • A survey of racial and ethnic relations, concentrating on the American experience. Stress is placed on the dynamics of prejudice and discrimination, and assimilation versus pluralism, including discussions of multiculturalism, bilingualism, and affirmative action.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3315 - Comparative and Transnational Sociology

    • This course examines the theoretical and methodological foundations of comparative and transnational sociology. In addition to explaining the classical sociological foundations of comparative sociology, the course explores the challenges posed to comparative sociology by the processes of globalization and transnationalization. In this context, the course explores the emerging transnational sociological approach that goes beyond the nation-state framework in analyzing cross-border processes and structures that inform contemporary global change.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3320 - Exploring the Aging Network

    • The class explores through field trips and speakers the range of services and programs that relate to aging in the Atlanta region and rural Georgia. The goal is to immerse students in the aging network so that they develop contacts, resources and knowledge for use in the family as well as work settings. The grade for the course will be based on attendance at field trips, online discussion and a paper related to the student's major, career path, and personal goals for the course.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3324 - Sociology of Gender

    • An examination of the implications of the changes in the kinship, economic, and political structures related to male/female relations and their impact on gender equality in contemporary society.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3333 - Technology and Society

    • This course will examine the interaction between scientific and technological development and social development, social structure and social issues.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 2105 or 1101 or ANTH 2105 or 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3334 - Sociology of Religion

    • Examination of religion as a social institution in historical, comparative, and contemporary terms. World religions and new religious movements are studied as sociocultural processes involving the need to know, to deal with problems and to adapt to change.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or ANTH 1102
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3344 - Biotechnology and Social Change

    • Modern biotechnology, a revolutionary innovation in science, is having major transforming effects on society. It is impacting the dinner table, agriculture, health and medicine, industrial processes, reproduction and has far-reacting implications for other areas of social life. This course is designed to examine the multiple manifestations of biotechnology and their social change implications. The course begins by locating the biotechnology revolution in the broader socio-historical context within which it is emerging, and explores its links to the new knowledge based economy. The course then focuses on the examination of the ways in which the development and application of biotechnology in its various manifestations are transforming the cultural and institutional character of modern societies. This will include an examination of social, ethical/moral and legal/legislative issues and their impact on policy.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 2105 or SOCI 1101 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3350 - Intersection of Race, Class and Gender

    • This course fills a gap in the curriculum as systems of social inequality, such as race, class, and gender are generally recognized as intersecting. We already offer separate courses in race and ethnicity, social class and mobility and the sociology of gender. By including an examination of race, class, and gender in one course grounded in an intersectionality perspective students will be more readily able to understand the ways in which such systems of inequality are created and perpetuated, how they interconnect, and the consequences of their multiplicative effects.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3354 - Social Class and Mobility

    • Examination of social class and hierarchy in America. Issues in empowerment, equality, styles of life, and the nature of poverty and social mobility will be highlighted.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3360 - Sociology of Violence

    • This course examines the root causes and consequences of violent behavior exhibited by individuals in our society. Topics covered include the social and cultural contexts that breed violence, society's influence on specific crimes, and human social behavior.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101 and SOCI 2105 or SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3364 - Sociology of the Family

    • Presents the institution of the family in historical and cross-cultural perspective, including an analysis of the American family system, its social structure and alteration, and its relation to other social institutions.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3374 - Sociology of Occupations

    • An analysis of the contemporary occupations, with emphasis on large scale organizations, the structure of occupations and the nature of work.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3380 - Society, Community and Health

    • This course explores the connections between society, communities, and the health of individuals. Topics include sociological approaches to global health inequalities, tensions between medicine and culture and the ethics of public health and biomedical research. Students critically analyze major issues of health and illness confronting selected sub-populations. The course introduces students to selected theoretical frameworks that address social determinants of health.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 3396 - Cooperative Study

    • A supervised work experience program for a minimum of two academic semesters at a previously approved site in business, industry, government or private agency. For sophomore, junior or senior level students who wish to obtain successive on the job experience in conjunction with their academic training.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of coordinator of cooperative education (CAPS) and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • SOCI 3398 - Internship

    • A structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting which is related to the student's major and career interests. Practical experience is combined with scholarly research in the topical area of the internship, under the guidance of an interdisciplinary faculty committee. Sites must be approved in advance of the semester of the internship. A departmental internship orientation session is scheduled at least once a semester.
    • Prerequisites: 90 hours and SOCI 3304
    • Credits: 1-12 Credit Hours
  • SOCI 4200 - Drugs, Alcohol and Society

    • This course examines drug use and abuse, including alcohol. Specifically, it examines how different drugs affect the body, theories of drug use, the sociological context of drug use, the impact of drug use and abuse on society, drug treatment, drug use policies, drugs and the law, and the extent of drug use in our society and globally.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4400 - Directed Study in Sociology

    • Covers special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings. May include original research projects and practicum experiences.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • SOCI 4410 - Advanced Qualitative Research Methods in Sociology

    • Students learn the qualitative strategies used in sociology research methods, including ethnographic techniques applied in sociology, participant observation, in-depth interviewing, and content analysis. Students learn ethical implications of social research, and how to design a qualitative research study, develop interview guides, construct content analysis templates, conduct observations on the field, conduct interviews, code data, and analyze qualitative data. Students learn skills using software applications for data management and analysis and write a research proposal.
    • Prerequisites: (SOCI 3305 or SOCI 2301) and SOCI 3300-may be taken concurrently
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4420 - Advanced Quantitative Research Methods in Sociology

    • This course examines the concepts and techniques used for quantitative research in sociology. Students learn to interpret, calculate, and critique the basic statistics used in quantitative methods in sociology. Students acquire the skills to use Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer program for managing and analyzing numerical data. Students learn the ethical implications of social science research and write a research proposal for a quantitative study.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 3305, MATH 1107, SOCI 3300 (may be taken concurrently)
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4432 - Criminology

    • An overview of theory and practice, the nature and cause of crime, and the etiology of criminal offenses and offenders.
    • Prerequisites: CRJU 1101 or SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4434 - Emerging Social Issues in Africa

    • As the twenty-first century unfolds Africa and its peoples are being engulfed by a series of social issues that are set to shape their collective futures. These interrelated social issues have important implications for Africa's social development and the attainment of enhanced quality of life for Africa and its peoples. Among the most relevant social issues are population growth, the state of health in the face of the AIDS epidemic, environmental change (e.g. desertification and loss of flora/fauna), food security/insecurity, political stability, public security, socio-cultural transformation resulting from globalization, and economic transitions. The central purpose of this sociological course is to examine the nature, patterns, sources and consequences of the identified social issues as well as potential remedies.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 2105 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4435 - Sociology of South Asia

    • This course examines social change and development in the South Asian societies through a historically informed analysis of social institutions in the region. Some of the key themes explored include contested histories, identity politics and nationalism, democratization, growth, poverty, and inequality. The course includes case studies from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka, but its main focus is on India.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4442 - Deviance and Social Control

    • A survey of the nature, causes, and consequences of deviant behavior. Provides an analysis of the problems of definition, identification, explanation, and social reaction to violations of institutional expectations. Presents techniques of social control.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4443 - Medical Sociology

    • Provides an analysis of (1) the social processes affecting conditions of health and illness and (2) the cluster of social relationships and organizations that comprise the social institution of health. Emphasizes the sociocultural factors that influence definitions of health and illness, causes, preventions and treatments, cross-cultural and interclass comparisons of stress, delivery of health care, mental illness, death and dying, and health care professionals.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4444 - Social Change and Modernization

    • The nature, types, and causes of social change; technological and sociocultural factors affecting processes of change. Innovation, diffusion, and the process of acceptance and rejection of change by social systems and social groups.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4445 - Sociology of Mental Illness

    • This course examines the social aspects of mental illness. Mental illness is not just a psychological or biological affliction. Because it is also, in part, socially created and controlled, the course is designed to help students understand who gets labeled 'sick' and why. Included are a review of the social history of mental illness and an examination of the institutions assigned to manage it. Among the topics considered will be how mental disorder is defined and diagnosed, and how it is treated. Also considered will be the social factors that influence its severity and course. One of the questions addressed will be whether all 'mental disorders' are 'diseases.' The applicability of a resocialization model to this issue will likewise be studied. Finally, the ethical aspects of all of these approaches will be considered.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or PSYC 1101 or permission of instructor.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • SOCI 4490 - Special Topics in Sociology

    • Selected topics of interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • SOCI 4499 - Senior Seminar in Sociology

    • This is the capstone course designed to help senior-level students integrate their learning from previous sociology courses and other courses in their concentration. Students will (1) carry out an individual research study or project; (2) present the results of that research in relation to the existing body of knowledge; (3) listen to the presentations of others and provide constructive criticism in a community of scholars; (4) cultivate the ability to reflect upon their experiences and synthesize the material from all of their sociology courses, including the central importance of the intersecting impact of race, class, and gender; (5) hone their skills at documenting their research in a final report.
    • Prerequisites: SOCI 3300, SOCI 3305
    • Credits: 3-0-3